Week 2

So far, this week has been quite lackluster. We came in on Monday expecting there to be students in the kindergarten school, but there weren’t. When we asked where they were our coordinator seemed just as confused as we were, and the response that we got was a confused shrug and an, “I don’t know. Maybe on Thursday they’ll come in to meet some teachers.” Well, it is now Friday and we have yet to meet or observe any of our students. We did, at least, learn what years and classes we would be teaching. I have the pleasure of teaching classes 6B, 6D, and shared lessons for 5C. This means that I will have two six year old classes and one five year old class. In reality though, I will be with five and four year olds because they are all about a year younger than they say they are. The shared lesson should be interesting. During a shared lesson, the Turkish teacher and the English teacher come together to create a combined lesson; it’s usually done with a story but in the case of the five year olds’ class it’ll probably be arts and crafts of sorts. For example, if there is a book that we want to read to the children, the Turkish teacher will introduce what the book is about to the children (not tell the story in Turkish) then the English teacher would read the book to the students, and then, finally, the Turkish teacher would finish up the lesson by asking the students about the book and such. Seems like a neat idea, right? Well, we shall see. Apparently, last year, there were a lot of complaints about the shared lessons because the Turkish teachers just saw it as a time that they didn’t have to do anything, and, at times, they wouldn’t even show up to the shared lessons. I’m hoping it won’t be like that this year.Β 
I’ll have twenty-six teaching hours (an hour over the twenty-five I should have which means I’ll get paid a little extra yippieeee!!!) this term: eleven hours with 6B, eleven hours with 6D, and four hours with 5C. We have been told that we will start our actual observations next week Monday thru Wednesday and then we will start our lessons on Thursday and Friday. I am interested to see how this actually pans out. Not going to lie, I am a bit nervous to start teaching since I’ve never done it before. At least the classes aren’t too large. Both of my six year old classes have four girls and eight boys. Hopefully, I’ll be able to handle that many boys. Crossing my fingers that they’ll all be little angels but who am I kidding? I should prepare myself for thirty-two crazy, little devils!

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A question from the final unit…

Summarize what you have personally gained from this course, and how you plan to put into action what you have learned:

Taking this course has done a lot more for me than I thought it would do. Aside from learning necessary teaching skills, I have learned that I do indeed have the ability to study outside of the classroom; this was due the motivation that I had from friends and family, and also thanks to the want and need for adventure and new experiences. Before taking this course, I had always had problems studying outside the classroom, because I never developed proper study skills when I was a child. What I have learned in this course will help me a long in my future job as I travel over to Turkey. Since taking this course, I have also found that when and if I return to the United States or an English speaking country, I would like to pursue a degree in either ESL or linguistics and teach children.

Classes start tomorrow!

FINALLY!

9 am – 11 am : Linguistica generele
11 am – 1 pm : Storia della lingua italiana

And that’s my Monday schedule.
Not complaining. I’m used to having three or four classes a day.
Too bad I still don’t know which classroom, or building for that matter, that the classes are in….